Content marketing: Telling Meaningful Stories

Twitter rolls out emoji search – so should we be using emojis 😳 in our social media posts❓ ⬇️

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You might care about this article if you are a:

  • Social media marketer 
  • Twitter content creator 
  • Content creator  

Emojis in social media posts ➑️ πŸ‘ or πŸ‘Žβ“

I’m not always a big fan of emojis in social media posts. But they can be effective in the right situations and for the right brands. πŸ™„πŸ˜†

And using emojis actually puts us mobile content creators at an advantage. I actually have three keyboards on my iPhone πŸ“±:

  • German 
  • English 
  • Emoji (how come there’s no emoji emoji by the way?) 🀣

Emojis are kind of a pain when you’re typing on a laptop. But there easy from your mobile πŸ“±, where I’m currently voice dictating this post from. 

On iPhones as you’re typing it even offers you emojis based on what you were just typing. Here’s an example: 


In this example, as I’m typing flower the iPhone is also suggesting the flower emoji – bottom right! I can then either replace the word flower with the emoji or add the emoji after the word. And here’s another trick. If you highlight the word like in the image below you sometimes get more options for appropriate emojis:


All three of these are examples of where the typing and suggesting worked:

I use emojis every once in a while – mostly to liven up tweets or draw some more attention to it. I’ve even used them in headlights on the blog before and I use them in blog posts all the time – a more recent thing. 

Whether or not you use emojis in your social media posts really depends on your brand and also your target audience. When your brand can pull emojis off in the social media 🌎  use them. They might work well and your audience might enjoy them.

Park West, a landscape company based in California, has been using emojis for a few months in tweets: 

Mark Fragola, Digital Marketing Specialist at Park West, came up with the idea. 

“I chose to use emojis due to their message,” he said via email.  “They can be expressive and fun and emphasize a word/phrase or even actions. Emojis create a more memorable tweet and make you pay a little more attention to what the tweet is about.”

I would agree with that statement from Mark. They definitely draw more attention to it because there are more visual and maybe even colorful depending on the emoji than just a text-based tweet. πŸŽ‰

As of this second you can’t actually click on an emoji in a tweet. That’s good and bad. Mostly good for the  content creator because it doesn’t take away from the readers clicking on the link. I’ve actually seen some tests where tweets with more hashtags, photos and links have fewer link clicks because people are clicking on all the other things (hashtags and photos) that they can click on.

How to use the Twitter emoji search

This whole πŸ˜ŽπŸ™ƒ topic came back top of mind for me when Twitter in May 2017 rolled out emoji search. Yep, you can now go to the Twitter search bar and search for emojis. So if you want to know who all used 🀒, πŸ€“ or maybe πŸ‘₯ you can now do that. That I potentially would have that need never actually crossed my mind.

It’s kind of hard on desktop because you don’t usually have that emoji  πŸŽΉ but in the mobile app it works fairly easily.

However, the autosuggestion like above   doesn’t work:

If you want to search for the flower emoji you have to find and type in the flower 🌺 emoji. 

Once the search is completed you can see all the recent tweets, or top tweets or  persons using the emoji in the search:


So the emoji Twitter search isn’t quite as easy to use as the hashtag search, but it might encourage more people to use emojis. 

When emojis add to the story in a tweet I’m all for them. 🀝 I just  don’t want to clutter up the tweet with unnecessary ones. Of course what’s too many or how many actually clutter up a tweet is a judgment call and also depends on the audience.

And by the way the meaning of some emojis isn’t  as clearly understood as they could be. For example, this one πŸ™ means thank you. But many times when I send it to people they  think it means that I’m praying, which doesn’t have an emoji as far as I can tell. 

And a series of emojis can indeed tell an entire story. Here’s one of these that I posted to my Facebook page:

Yep, that was basically my day.

And then of course there’s James Corden of the Late Late Show who does a whole segment surrounding Emoji News. Basically a recent news event is displayed in emojis only and  an audience member has to guess  the full story. Click on the image below for an example (be aware that content from the show is not always suitable for children πŸ‘Ά):


So, to wrap things up: use emojis in your posts when they fit with your brand and help tell a better story. πŸ™ŒπŸ‘ŠβœοΈ



Disclaimers: The information provided in articles is for informational purposes only and not personalized advice. It's accurate to the best of my knowledge at the time it's published. Enjoy and best of luck telling the best stories in your organization and life!

Christoph Trappe

Hello and thanks for stopping by. I’m Christoph Trappe.

I’ve written two books, speak at conferences around the globe and blog frequently on here. I love sharing my stories and helping organizations share theirs.

If you need help, just visit the Contact Me page in the navigation and drop me a note. I’m always happy to chat!

Thanks for reading!

– Christoph
ctrappe@christophtrappe.com
319-389-9853

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