The latest blogging-related marketing technique: “Reverse content marketing”

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Corporate blogs have goals and when done well they should be tied to some kind of business performance:

  • Raised brand awareness
  • Establishing the organization as a publicly recognized thought leader
  • New customer acquisition
  • Customer retention
  • Etc.

Related: How to use content marketing to retain customers

And blogging does work as part of forward content marketing:

  1. We share valuable and educational information that solves our audience’s problems.
  2. It establishes us as an expert in our particular field.
  3. Some readers recognize our blogs as an expert publication but will simply do things themselves. That happens and is okay. But they know us when they need us. They don’t need our help or want it or like to spend the time on a new project.
  4. But, some readers will recognize our blogs as an expert publication AND do NOT want to do everything themselves. Or they may need some advice.

Especially in the the case of No. 4, those readers turn into customers. They contact us, hire us in some capacity and the Inbound and Content Marketing kings are happy about how that just worked.

And then there’s a new tactic I recently ran across. I’ll call it reverse content marketing.

As you know, I blog a lot. About all kinds of topics related to storytelling and content marketing and people read them! Yay! Thanks, all! They also respond to share their own thoughts and share on social media. But here’s a new response:

A company that offers some kind of employee advocacy tool or software, read an article I wrote on employee advocacy. They called me to congratulate and thank me for an interesting article. Oh, thank you!

And then started talking about their product and how it might help me with my employee advocacy. I can’t tell you who it was or anything else about the product, because I was too busy to stay on a call like that, but then started thinking about this strategy.

I certainly get emails asking for project quotes and even occasional phone calls to inquire me working for them after writing a blog post. But I never received this kind of call where a blog post written by me prompted somebody to call me to hire them! I’ll call it reverse content marketing.

  • Somebody shares their thoughts, stories and knowledge publicly (content marketing)
  • Somebody else, somebody whose target audience is you, keeps an eye out for those stories through Google Alerts, for example, and then reaches out to see if you want to work with them!

I have no idea if it works, but given that I’ve received a number of calls like this now, I would say that it likely does work just well enough.

The other thing that makes reverse content marketing attractive to try is that not that many people do it currently. Hardly anyone, according to my own personal experience at least. The fewer people execute on a technique there’s always a market for that early adopter surge of success. Do something first, catch people’s attention, capitalize on that.

If you have tried this before or have questions, use the form below to drop me a note:

Will I try this myself? I’m considering it. If I do, I’ll let you know how it worked or didn’t work.