Looking for word porn producers!

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Exactly. What a crazy title. Word porn producers of course are writers – apparently good ones.

I’ve used this language before admittedly and unfortunately and see people use it all the time:

A good book is now word porn.

Pictures of your new shoes are now shoe porn.

Travel pictures – travel porn.

New buildings – interior design porn.

Every meal tries to live up to food porn.

What’s word (or another topic) porn? Everything good is now porn. Adding the word porn signals that something is worth consuming and maybe a little addictive.

I get the intent here. We want to highlight how awesome the content is and that we can’t look away.

We are tight to the book (and I’m not talking a specific porn category here). It’s so good, we can’t put it down.

Travel bloggers post pictures from far-away places that we can only visit after spending $100,000 on our credit cards. Sure, we can’t look away and when we do they just post new scenes pictures from their trips.

Why can’t we just call it great writing or great travel blogging, reporting, whatever.

Not everything needs to be porn this and that.

I get that language changes and maybe this will be mainstream one day. Side note: I once spoke at an adult industry marketer conference and my session was titled mainstream keynote. Pretty sure I didn’t make it to the level of keynote porn that day.

Conference clips here!

I can just see this conversation somewhere:

“What are you looking at?” – father

“Word porn by <author name>,” 12-year-old.

OR:

“Dad, I want to be a word porn producer now.”

OMG.

With that being said though writers marketing themselves with that title – especially ghostwriters – might have a marketing advantage. Of course, they’ll have to deliver!

Related: Why hiring a ghostwriter is just fine

It just doesn’t seem right and feel right and we are mixing one thing that some hotel networks block from accessing with everyday mainstream stuff.

I like the intend but not a fan of the verbiage.

I also know that language is one of the easiest things for people to pick on. Use the wrong tense, people get more bend out of shape than when something actually bad happened.

Typ0s on a resume disqualify people from roles, but it’s okay that the rejection letter “writer” can use correct American English?

So it’s easy, but leaving that here for you. Thoughts? Overreaction? Agree? Drop me a note here.