Content marketing: Telling Meaningful Stories

INBOUND TIPS: Before you change your job on LinkedIn have a strategy

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You got a new job and you’re ready to change your LinkedIn profile. Ready to update that online listing with your new place of employment, maybe a higher title and updated responsibilities. Ready to share some news!

But before you do that did you think about what the posting will do to your network? Or, maybe more importantly for us marketers, what the update can do for you?

Because here’s what can happen once you publish your job change to your network: people will respond and some of them might even turn into business leads or customers.

Of course, I’m assuming that your settings are set to notify your network when you update your profile. I would always recommend that because what’s the harm to let people know that you change jobs or updated your responsibilities or whatever it might be? So when you update your profile just keep an eye out for that setting-it should be right there-and make sure it’s set to yes, sharing is enabled.

So let’s look at post engagement on LinkedIn. Most of my posts on LinkedIn get viewed under 150 times. Many of them are automatic posts coming over from my blog.

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But the best performing posts from me on LinkedIn are ones that have photos. Yes, I know everyone is talking about the importance of photos-especially authentic ones-on social media. And they do get more views than posts without photos. Here’s an example:


So this really simple post with a number of photos-which is a new feature LinkedIn rolled out in summer 2017-had over 700 views. Pretty good.

Interestingly, view wise this tongue-in-cheek post about my nine-year-old knowing what the Twitter checkmark means had the most views recently with over 1,000.

Related: How to get the Twitter

But the award for most comments and messages on any of my LinkedIn posts in probably years goes to the post that shared that I have started a new job at ScribbleLive.

First I updated my title to VP of Content Marketing Strategy, Americas.

Healthcare strategist Ed Bennett actually told me in a phone call that he saw that update first and kind of disregarded it because he was doing something else.

In the meantime, I noticed that previous jobs listed my title as Vice President and I thought changing my profile style to VP wouldn’t match the overall style. So I went back to my profile and changed my title to Vice President of Content Marketing Strategy, Americas.

Ed mentioned to me that he saw the second update too and it was a reminder that he wanted to send me a congratulatory note. He did and we ended up talking on the phone about content marketing.

Here’s the second post by the way and as you can see, just like the first one, it did collect a lot of likes as well:

Interestingly the first post had around 100 likes and the second post around 60. Of course, I can’t tell which post prompted more private messages. But I probably got more private messages than I’ve gotten the first six months of the year together.

Now part of your strategy could be to actually get that update posted to your timeline twice. I didn’t mean to do that but if you wanted to you could post the title first, then later update it again and add more description. I didn’t get any complaints from anybody that it was posted twice and I did notice a few people liking both posts.

Probably the most important part of the strategy should be to think about what you will do when people message you.

Some people actually message me with legitimate business requests that were prompted by my job change. So it is important to keep that in mind and have a plan to follow up quickly. We wouldn’t want to write back: “Oh sorry I’m onboarding for six months. Talk to you then.” 😱🤔

So it’s something to think about when switching jobs. Of course, this is not a sustainable strategy as you can’t change jobs every other week just to generate leads or increase engagement on LinkedIn. But when you do, have a plan and make it count. Of course, remember not everyone messaging is a lead. Some people are “just” connections. They are happy for you to advance your career. In the case of those messages the plan should include responding with “thank you.”



Disclaimers: The information provided in articles is for informational purposes only and not personalized advice. It's accurate to the best of my knowledge at the time it's published. Enjoy and best of luck telling the best stories in your organization and life!

Christoph Trappe

Hello and thanks for stopping by. I’m Christoph Trappe.

I’ve written two books, speak at conferences around the globe and blog frequently on here. I love sharing my stories and helping organizations share theirs.

If you need help, just visit the Contact Me page in the navigation and drop me a note. I’m always happy to chat!

Thanks for reading!

– Christoph
ctrappe@christophtrappe.com
319-389-9853

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