How I used the Twitter threads function to promote a podcast

Estimated read time: 2 minutes


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I started recording some fun podcasts over on the Stamats website to share information around the topics that are to be covered at the annual Adult Student Marketing Conference in San Diego in 2019. The first one was right up my alley as we discussed targeted marketing with Davia Lassiter – a higher education marketing director.

Of course, we published the podcast and made it easy for people to register for the conference as well!


Then further down, we published the transcript:

I always recommend publishing the transcript for three reasons:

  • Accessibility!
  • Readers who can’t listen to audio because they are sitting in an office or somewhere else where they can’t turn the audio on. Allowing them to read it is a way to still get them consume the content
  • Search engine optimization. It allows search engines to index your article!

Then, promote it on other channels, like Alexa-devices if you have that set up, distribute to other podcast channels and more. Of course, social media is another channel. I’ve talked about Twitter threads before and you can check out this article how to do them!

I tried them again for this article. Basically, I went to Twitter and started hacking up pieces from the atomizing the article into a Twitter thread:

How did they perform? From the top down:

And No. 2 went down:

And No. 3 went up actually:

And No. 4 even more:

The last tweet was the second best performing interestingly:

Of course all the performance that I saw focused on impressions – how many people saw it! Hundreds of views isn’t bad and many of those tweets could stand alone – or at least in the thread. But I didn’t see very many link clicks.


Interesting to see the varying numbers for impressions and I’m not totally surprised with Twitter’s algorithm. People may see the last tweet first or one in the middle. Just because you are tweeting:

1

2

3

4

5

 

Doesn’t mean people see it in that order. They may appear in this order:

4

2

3

1

5

The algorithm tries to serve what it thinks is most relevant.

Either way, no matter what tweet shows first, the reader can always click on read full thread to see the full thread. I do that more and more as more and more people are using threads to share longer stories. Of course, don’t use a Twitter thread instead of a blog! Blogs still matter and can help with your SEO, which is why in part we did the transcript above.

Long story short: In the old days – like 2 years months ago who would have thought that podcasts need to be transcribed and that the transcript then can be used as standalone or threaded tweets!